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20/20 Visions

Big Barnes Ponder Charrette – 7 years on

February’s blog is by Emma Robinson, the Town Centre Manager for Barnes Community Association, who reflects on the Big Barnes Ponder 7 years on:

20mph limit introduced January 2020 following community campaign that began at the Barnes Ponder

“The process highlighted that the community is best placed to shape and direct its own destiny and that projects delivered with full community involvement are inevitably going to deliver the best results.”

It has now been almost seven years since the Barnes charrette of 2013 and what a journey it has been!  At the time I embarked on the Big Barnes Ponder, as we called our charrette, I had no idea the impact it would have on me as Town Centre Manager, on our team of volunteers and on Barnes.

Our charrette visioning day in October 2013 enabled us to harness the ideas of the community to create a resident-led vision for the future of Barnes.  It was a successful event that brought residents of all ages together to think creatively about the future with the support of planning experts.  These residents were passionate about the future and gave up several hours of their time to help us plan. The process highlighted that the community is best placed to shape and direct its own destiny and that projects delivered with full community involvement are inevitably going to deliver the best results.

Barnes Ponder Problems Dreams Solutions workshop

The charrette was just the beginning of our journey.  Over the last seven years we have seen many highs, as projects have come to fruition, and many lows as we have come up against delays and challenge, but what has kept me going is the enthusiasm of our many volunteers for the projects they work on.  Our volunteers have changed over the years but a few have stayed with us on the journey and have given so much time and energy to our community projects.

The key to our success so far without a doubt has been our ability to harness the support of residents for the projects they identified. This has enabled us to influence key decision makers, whether that’s the Council or TfL, our MP or our ward councillors.  We have also been able to benefit from the extensive skill sets of our local volunteers to enable to us to tackle even the most challenging engineering problem.

Persistence is also incredibly important.  We wouldn’t have got where we are today if we took no for an answer.  Most of our projects have taken many years to come to fruition and would no doubt have disappeared many years ago without the dedication of our volunteers.

Monthly collectors market around Barnes Pond

Our successes so far have been many and include the realisation of projects for a new community playground and a footbridge and also the realisation of a vibrant high street despite the economic challenges. We have been recognised nationally for the work we have done in Barnes and I have spoken about the Ponder charrette experience in Parliament and at conferences. Barnes was a runner up in the Great British High Streets competition of 2018.

We have still got a long way to go but we have established a reputation for the quality of the work we do and for delivery and so the future looks positive.  I’m sure there will be many more great projects delivered in Barnes by the Big Barnes Ponder team.

Barnes Pond (Photo copyright Andrew Wilson www.wildlondon.co.uk)

The Liberties – 10 years on

January’s blog is by Clare San Martin who revisited the Liberties, Dublin 10 years after leading the collaborative process to draw up of the Liberties Area Action Plan for Dublin City Council. The Liberties is an historic area of Dublin, famous as the home of the Guinness brewery.  Huge development pressure from the Celtic Tiger economy in the 2000s led Dublin City Council (DCC) to commission JTP to work with the local community to co-create a Vision and develop the Area Action Plan.

This article is an unabridged version of that published in the latest edition of the Academy of Urbanism’s Here & Now Journal:

In May 2019 I revisited The Liberties area of south-central Dublin to find out what has changed ten years after DCC adopted the Liberties Local Area Plan (LAP) – a community-led regeneration strategy for this historic city neighbourhood.  As leader of the Liberties LAP masterplanning team, a productive collaboration between JTP and Metropolitan Workshop, I got to know the place and people well and developed a great fondness for both. Fourteen months of intensive community participation preceded adoption of the Plan in 2009. It remains City policy and sets out a detailed strategy for delivering social, economic and physical regeneration through high quality placemaking on major opportunity sites.

LAP Major Opportunity Sites and Key

But the property crash following the Credit Crunch meant developers, once hungry for land in The Liberties, put their ambitious plans on hold and dashed the community’s hopes of delivering new social infrastructure and environmental improvements. So ten years later I was unsure what to expect. Had the whole exercise been a waste of time? Would any of the transformative projects have happened? What I found took me by surprise and made me reflect on the value of the work we’d done.

Back in 2008 The Liberties community was passionate about defending their neighbourhood from what they saw as poor quality, inappropriate development. Indeed, they had good reason to be alarmed. In the 1960s historic streets in the Coombe area of The Liberties had been left derelict for years, blighted by a road ‘improvement’ plan before being demolished to sever the neighbourhood with a brutal four-lane highway. Hard drugs devastated the community in the 1980s. Historic buildings were left empty and many demolished as they deteriorated beyond repair. At the time we were appointed the Guinness Brewery was considering moving significant parts of its production process elsewhere. The National College of Art and Design (NCAD) was also talking of moving out of the area – and all this at the same time as other areas of the city, including docklands, experienced a boom. Developers were turning their eyes towards The Liberties and promoting plans for new buildings on the scale of those in docklands. The community strongly objected to schemes they felt would threaten the special character of The Liberties and their way of life. They were not against change and understood the benefits development could bring through funding improvements. But they were adamant that development should to be of an appropriate scale, include the restoration and re-use of heritage buildings and ensure existing residents were not driven out.

The LAP involved many hours of workshops and discussions with the community, DCC and other interested parties to achieve plans that were acceptable and economically viable. A comprehensive participatory Community Planning process led to the establishment of The Liberties Forum with focus groups facilitated by consultants developing and presenting back Action Plans for different aspects of the regeneration strategy. The final LAP included proposals to improve connectivity by establishing routes through some of the large industrial sites earmarked for redevelopment and detailed plans for improving the public realm and increasing greenspace. A new library and sports facilities were planned. A tourism strategy was designed to enable local traders to benefit from the million visitors coming to Guinness Storehouse each year with a heritage tourist trail to encourage visitors to walk through the area and stay a while rather than making straight for the Storehouse on a coach and leaving without exploring The Liberties. The LAP’s mandatory heights strategy set parameters to protect views from the Storehouse and other places. Former industrial sites were re-zoned for mixed use including new homes to accommodate around 7,000 new residents and a rolling programme of DCC housing estate redevelopment was agreed that ensured existing tenants could move into well-designed new homes in the same area.

But like the rest of the development industry we did not see what was coming next. By 2009 when the LAP became policy, the property crash had changed everything. Revisiting ten years later I found some parts of The Liberties unchanged, which is what I’d feared and expected. But other areas were transformed – some in the way we planned but some in a completely different way.

I met some residents who had taken part in the Forum and workshops and others who were unaware of the original process but actively involved in implementing greenspace improvements. One group invited me a workshop to plan how to involve more local people in the design and management of a new park at Bridgefoot Street on derelict land owned by DCC where they already had a community garden.

Meanwhile uses on Bridgefoot St open space

In 2014, in response to the economic situation that put the LAP’s ambitious plans in jeopardy, the City Council published a Greening Strategy focusing on sites they owned and which had a ‘realistic chance of being implemented in the medium term’. Many of these public realm improvements have now been completed.

Open Space improvements by DCC at St Audeon’s Church – Dublin’s only remaining medieval parish church

One of the great surprises was the revival of brewing and distilling – historic Liberties industries that had seemed on the decline or were looking to relocate. Much of the LAP was based on industries moving out and freeing up land for development of housing and other uses but I discovered Diageo Guinness has built a state-of-the-art brewery and were about to open their new whiskey distillery, branded as Roe & Co. Three other urban whiskey distilleries had also been built – each with an interesting story and each regenerating part of the Liberties.

The Pearse Lyons distillery on James’s Street has delivered a highly innovative re-use of the former church of St James and the sensitive restoration of its historic graveyard is nearing completion. The church now hosts whiskey tasting and has a dramatic glass spire.

Another LAP objective was the regeneration of Newmarket, a neglected area with an historic market square located to the South of the Coombe. Two new distilleries have been established there. This is fantastic, although it was disappointing to see the visitors arriving and leaving on a tour bus rather than wandering down past the antique shops along Francis Street or experiencing the colourful market on Meath Street as we had hoped.

Teeling Whiskey Distillery Newmarket – tourists arrive by bus

Newmarket also demonstrates another phenomenon seen throughout the Liberties – new student housing. Just outside the LAP boundary several large blocks have been built in a striking contemporary style. There is also a 3-star hotel with a rooftop bar. Residents I spoke to welcomed students and tourists but feared the amount of student housing was too great and would result in a transient community overwhelming other residents and changing the character of the area. The close-knit Liberties community where families have lived for generations is part of its unique charm.

New student housing near Newmarket

The same combination of student accommodation and a hotel has been built around the Digital Hub, Ireland’s largest cluster of digital media and internet companies which occupies former industrial buildings on Thomas Street. Here digital media companies are thriving in re-used historic buildings. A new pedestrian route has been implemented as planned and creates a convenient cut through a big urban block. A pop-up coffee shop was doing a brisk trade on the route. The LAP heights strategy has preserved the setting of St Patrick’s Tower, an historic windmill, and a network of internal routes and courtyards with restored historic structures and contemporary buildings has created a lively new quarter.

New pedestrian route with view of St Partick’s Tower, Europe’s largest smock windmill that once powered the Roe Whiskey Distillery

Historic Grain Store re-used as offices with associated open space

Pop up coffee shop on former car park near St Patrick’s Tower

Bringing derelict historic buildings back into use, an important LAP objective, is evident throughout the area. But there are also many examples of important buildings left empty and deteriorating. A notable and tragic example is the Iveagh Markets on Francis Street, an indoor market opened in 1906 which has been empty since the 1990s. The mouldering structure blights surrounding streets that were once a bustling hub of small independent shops and street traders.

The Iveagh Market

Disappointingly there was no evidence of DCC’s council estates being rebuilt or of the new library which was a central part of the cultural regeneration strategy. However, DCC’s 2009 housing scheme at Timberyard in the Coombe by architects O’Donnell and Tuomey, provides an excellent exemplar for future social housing in The Liberties.

DCC housing, the Timberyard

In response to the slow delivery of housing nationally, the Irish Government introduced a new fast-track planning system in 2017 whereby planning applications for housing developments over 100 residential units and 200 plus student bed spaces can be made directly to Ireland’s national planning appeals board, An Bord Pleanála. All applications must be determined within the target period of 16 weeks and although pre-application discussions with the local authority are required, the time constraint means these are limited. Many people I spoke to were concerned that design quality and The Liberties regeneration objectives would be ignored in the rush to get housing built.

So, on reflection, The Liberties LAP covered such a complex area and in so much detail that it was unrealistic to expect to find it implemented as planned, even without the economic downturn. But it did provide a robust framework for public realm improvements that enabled DCC to implement them knowing that each individual improvement would support the creation of a cohesive place over time. It was flexible enough to enable DCC to prepare amended plans that adapted to new economic circumstances without losing the overall Vision.

There are certainly successes to celebrate like the Digital Hub and Guinness quarters and the new distilleries. But urgent action is needed to save the Iveagh Markets and other heritage gems. The improvement of DCC’s housing estates remains a challenge and the increasing amount student housing a concern.  If left unchecked it could reach a tipping point that drives other residents away including the indigenous Liberties families who are the heart and soul of the place.

The comprehensive community engagement for the LAP is remembered by some but a new generation of activists has emerged. Residents’ groups are actively involved in a host of individual projects but lack a central forum which would enable them to act more effectively. It would be a terrible waste if a rush to deliver housing numbers led to the shared Vision unravelling and poor quality schemes like those the community objected to all those years ago being built.

The Liberties still has huge untapped potential. There are major opportunity sites to be brought forward. Its community is still passionate about protecting its heritage and way of life. With many long-planned projects now underway the Vision seems much closer to being realised even though it has taken a lot longer than expected and will need to adapt to changes we can’t foresee. But that’s what great neighbourhoods in great cities do – and The Liberties in Dublin is certainly one of them.

20/20 Visions author Charles Campion appointed to Glasgow Place Commission: considering how design can make a better Glasgow

The Place Commission, led by Glasgow’s City Urbanist, Professor Brian Evans, held it’s first meeting on Wednesday 13 November 2019.

The Place Commission for Glasgow can be seen as an ongoing conversation with the city’s communities, developers, designers and other partners to consider how the built environment can best respond to and serve the new ways in which we live, work and travel – to create a better quality of place for the people of Glasgow.

Over the course of the next year, the Place Commission will meet to discuss how this can happen, with three main themes framing the discussions – the Everyday City (how we experience the city as residents, workers, business people, or visitors); the Metropolitan City (recognising the interdependence between Glasgow and the rest of the Clyde Valley); and the International City (considering Glasgow’s place on the international stage).

Professor Brian Evans, Glasgow’s City Urbanist, said:

“This is a great opportunity to hold a big conversation about Glasgow, its region, communities and places. Working within the context of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Scottish Government’s ‘Place Principle’, we will be looking to evidence how integrated action in respect of demographic, climate and technological change can, when designed around people, improve the quality of peoples’ lives and their places.”

The Place Commission comprises experts from a variety of fields, each with an interest in the topics to be considered. These independent commissioners are: Ann Allen, Chair, Architecture and Design Scotland; Jude Barber, Director/Architect at Collective Architecture; Dr Linda de Caestecker, Director of Public Health, NHSGGC; Charles Campion, Partner, JTP (Architects and Urbanists); Kevin Kane, Executive Director, Glasgow Economic Leadership; Professor Carol Tannahill, Director, Glasgow Centre for Population Health; Rachel Tennant, Chair of Landscape Institute Scotland, and Dr Brian Veitch, Consulting Engineer and Former Director, ARUP.

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said:

“Glasgow is a city still very much in transition, one which is barely recognisable from the post-industrial Glasgow of just a couple of decades ago. The physical transformation of so many of our neighbourhoods, our riverside, parts of the east end and the ongoing work at Sighthill and the city centre through the Avenues project is testament to that change. But with still much to do I’m delighted that a panel of such esteemed independent experts can help support our city’s development as a people-focused city which is s a great place to live, work and visit.”

 

The Commission also welcomes new ideas from creative thinkers that can help a design-based approach to the built environment create better places for people in Glasgow – those interested should contact Joseph Harvey (joseph.harvey@glasgow.gov.uk / 0141 287 6272) or Jordan Howard (jordan.howard@glasgow.gov.uk / 0141 287 1160).

Recommendations

The recommendations of the Place Commission will be made in Autumn 2020.

@PlaceGlasgow

Glasgow Place Commission Launched

Speaking on the final day of the Glasgow United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) conference on city living, Professor Brian Evans, Glasgow’s City Urbanist, has announced the setting up of the Place Commission.

The Commission will be an ongoing collaborative conversation with Glasgow’s communities, developers, designers and other partners to consider how the built environment can best respond to and serve the new ways in which we live, work and travel – to create a better quality of place for the people of the city.

Over the course of the next year, the Place Commission will meet to discuss how this can happen, with three main themes framing the discussions – the Everyday City (how we experience the city as residents, workers, business people, or visitors); the Metropolitan City (recognising the interdependence between Glasgow and the rest of the Clyde Valley); and the International City (considering Glasgow’s place on the international stage).

“This is a great opportunity to hold a big conversation about Glasgow, its region, communities and places. Working within the context of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Scottish Government’s ‘Place Principle’, we will be looking to evidence how integrated action in respect of demographic, climate and technological change can, when designed around people, improve the quality of peoples’ lives and their places.” Prof Brian Evans

Alongside Professor Evans on the Place Commission will be experts from a variety of related fields, each with an interest in the topics to be considered. These independent commissioners are: Ann Allen (Chair, Architecture and Design Scotland); Jude Barbour, Director/Architect at Collective Architecture; Dr Linda de Caestecker, Director of Public Health, NHSGGC; Charles Campion, Partner, JTP and author of 20/20 Visions; Kevin Kane, Executive Director, Glasgow Economic Leadership; Professor Carol Tannahill, Director, Glasgow Centre for Population Health; Rachel Tennant, Chair of Landscape Institute Scotland, and Dr Brian Veitch, Consulting Engineer and Former Director, ARUP.

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said:

“Glasgow is a city still very much in transition, one which is barely recognisable from the post-industrial Glasgow of just a couple of decades ago.

“I’m delighted that a panel of such esteemed independent experts can help support our city’s development as a people-focused city which is s a great place to live, work and visit.”

The recommendations of the Place Commission will be made in Autumn 2020 and will be reported here.

The original article can be read here.

Ian Harvey from Civic Voice announces ‘Community Planning Forum’ as part of campaign for a greater voice for communities in planning

Ian Harvey, Executive Director at Civic Voice, has announced that the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Civic Societies is establishing a ‘Community Planning Forum’ – an independent cross-party group to look at what a ‘meaningful voice for communities in the planning system should look like’. The forum will call on developers to share their approach to community engagement, and ask local authorities about innovative schemes in their area.

“We need early and more meaningful participation in the planning system.” Ian Harvey, Civic Voice

The APPG will promote a ‘carrot and stick’ approach to changing the behaviour of local authorities and developers and will look for evidence and examples to demonstrate that it ‘pays’ for developers to engage earlier with communities. Civic Voice believe that front-loading public participation can lead to higher quality developments.

Against this background, the new Community Planning Forum will bring together community representatives, campaigners, developers, planners and politicians to discuss how to address public concerns about new development, promote better practice by planners and developers and foster more constructive relations overall. The first, invitation only meeting, will be held in September.

Civic Voice will act as the Secretariat to this group. For more information please contact info@civicvoice.org.uk.

Below Image: Civic Voice Publication “Collaborative Planning for All” which can be downloaded here.

National Charrette Institute discussed collaboration strategies at CNU 27.Louisville Conference

The Congress for New Urbanism hosted their annual conference, CNU 27.Louisville, June 12-15, 2019, in Kentucky.

On Thursday, June 13, National Charrette Institute’s (NCI) director Holly Madill participated in a panel session on “Working Toward Yes: Dealing with Divided Communities”. Participants were able to learn from the real-world experiences of three practitioners, and one community representative who participated in a particularly difficult public design process. Bill Lennertz, president of Collaborative Design and Innovation LLC and NCI trainer, moderated the session. Other panelists included:

  • Jennifer Hurley, AICP, CNU-A, PP, president and CEO of Hurley-Franks & Associates;
  • Stacie Nicole Smith, senior mediator for the Consensus Building Institute; and
  • George Proakis, executive director of Strategic Planning & Development for Somerville, Massachusetts.

This session provided commonsense solutions to three vexing and common problems:

  1. How to reach groups that are typically not served,
  2. how to avoid meeting fatigue, and
  3. dealing with disruptive participants.

From the NCI perspective, these can be addressed by careful preparation of the charrette process to engage stakeholders, and making sure the charrette framework and individual engagements within it are designed to meet the intended outcomes. Using the creative design process can also make engagements interesting and meaningful.

NCI June NEWS

For more please click here

Charles Campion speaking at the AiA ‘19 Conference in Las Vegas

On Saturday 10 June 2019 JTP Partner Charles Campion will be speaking at the AiA ‘19 Conference in Las Vegas at a session entitled “Community Engagement, Diversity & Inclusion in International Practice”.

Charles, author of 20/20 Visions: Collaborative Planning & Placemaking (RIBA Publishing), will share the platform with chair Alison Laas AIA, Associate at Payette, Boston and Patricia Natke, FAIA, President & Design Principal at UrbanWorks, Chicago.

Architects across the globe are passionate about leveraging the design process to find creative and innovative participation strategies for diversity and inclusion in our communities. The panel includes leaders from different firms who are developing approaches and policies to better engage communities in designing a more inclusive built environment.

Charles Campion says, “Communities add critical economic, social and environmental value to planning and placemaking processes and the United States is where co-design Charrette processes were first conceived over 50 years ago. The AIA’s first R/UDAT (Regional Urban Design Assistance Team) was held in 1967 and the programme is still thriving today. I am excited to be presenting international case studies from 20/20 Visions and exchanging best practice in community planning with colleagues from across North America.”

Objectives of the session

  1. Exploring innovative strategies for community engagement from US-based and international projects that increase diversity and participation in the design process and equitable outcomes for the built environment.
  2. Learning about engagement programs, like R/UDAT, that promote community participation by typically under-represented parties, and interdisciplinary design teams, to drive inclusive and successful project outcomes.
  3. Discovering how designers based in the US and abroad have approached international projects and successfully engaged with communities from cultures, nationalities, and contexts that are different from those of the design team.
  4. Understanding the challenges communities face in increasing equity, diversity and inclusion, and how the built environment can be leveraged to increase opportunities for all community members.

Walking workshop: The future of Hammersmith Bridge, London as a world-class walking & cycling link, Sat 18 May 2019

Venue: Rutland Arms, 15 Lower Mall, Hammersmith, London W6 9DJ
Date & Time: Saturday 18 May 2019, 11.00am – 1.30pm
Book your place at the workshop here
Walking workshop organised by London Car Free Day

10.30am Meet in front of the Rutland Arms pub
11am – 12noon Walk across Hammersmith Bridge with local guides
12noon – 1.30pm Pub lunch at the Rutland Arms and presentations on what the bridge could be like as a permanent walking and cycling connection for London.

Hammersmith Bridge trial as a business-boosting walking & cycling link for summer 2019
Hammersmith Bridge could be London’s most impressive new walking and cycling provision. It has been traffic-free since early April and this meeting will bring together community, business, and local government stakeholders to discuss the bridge’s potential future as an example of world-class walking and cycling infrastructure.

With the Chelsea Flower just around the corner, Car Free Day London has invited the RHS and others to join the dialogue and share ideas for greening bridge over the summer months, showcasing what a permanent walking and cycling bridge could look like. Partners at Meristem Design and Abundance London have been invited to share their ideas for new parklets and native planting on the bridge and at the new public spaces that have been opened up at either end. The Hammersmith BID (Business Improvement District) and its members will also be invited to share views on the bridge’s future function as an attractive new piece of transport infrastructure and public realm.

Representatives from the neighbourhoods most polluted schools and the Hammersmith and Fulham Air Quality Commission will also be invited to participate in the discussion on how a pedestrian and cycling bridge could catalyse better air quality and more active travel across the borough.

Moderated discussion with:
David Chamberlain, Commissioner, London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham Air Quality Commission
Clare Wadd, Chair, London Ramblers
Casey Abaraonye, Chair, Hammersmith & Fulham Cyclists
Councillor Stephen Cowan, Leader, London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham (invited)

Please see details on the proposal for a summer trial of the bridge for walking and cycling here:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iMk7JSa_wTlihlVo13Y7Lpe33uOBqnbv8lz6-_Gog4U/edit

 

Community Planning Pioneer John Thompson receives Urban Design Group (UDG) Lifetime Achievement Award

John Thompson, has been presented with the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award at the UDG National Urban Design Awards 2019.

The award follows John receiving an American Institute of Architects AIA Presidential Citation in February this year, affirming his contribution to the architectural profession and his unique standing in the fields of urban design and collaborative planning and placemaking.

John has had a 50-year career as a renowned architect and urbanist, devoted to improving the quality of everyday life in neighbourhoods. From the very beginning of his career in the early 1970’s as a partner at Hunt Thompson Associates, John pursued a pioneering approach; first community architecture and then community planning, working directly with local people to create places that encourage social interaction and help nurture a strong sense of community, often in areas experiencing significant social and economic challenges.

In 1994 John became founder chair of John Thompson and Partners, now known as JTP.  In 1998 JTP’s multi-award-winning regeneration of the former Caterham Barracks marked the first time that a large-scale Community Planning Weekend (aka Charrette) process had been promoted in the UK by a private developer.

Involving local people in the planning process has since been written into English planning policy (through Localism and the NPPF) and is now a required part of every significant planning application, thanks in large part to John’s influence.

In 2006 John was instrumental in establishing the Academy of Urbanism (AoU), a not-for-profit organisation which now has over six hundred members, including the thriving Young Urbanists group. The AoU brings together the current and next generation of urban leaders, thinkers and practitioners to recognise, encourage and celebrate great places across the UK, Europe and beyond.

Throughout the years John has used his remarkable drive, influence and natural charisma to make a significant contribution to the lives of people across the UK and Europe. David Harrison, one of JTP’s founding partners and known as “Harry the Pencil”, collected the Lifetime Achievement Award on John’s behalf, and said:

“At JTP, with residential developers as clients, John persuaded many to adopt urban design principles and mixed use and even in some cases tenure blind projects, therefore adding vitality, diversity and much needed life to the urban environment.

John was unusual for his time in that although trained as an architect he had a passion for creating good places and saw placemaking as the core discipline in his work and visionary initiatives.

But what I think is the most remarkable thing about John was his ability to convincingly communicate these ideas not only to the hundreds of collaborators, including myself and some others present in this room this evening, but also to the literally thousands of so called “ordinary people” who attended JTP Community Planning Weekends at venues all around this country and overseas.”

The Caterham Barracks collaborative planning process features as one of the case studies in “20/20 Visions” along with this quote from John that encapsulates his philosophy:

“The essence of community planning is simple – all around us we are surrounded by people who have within themselves, whether they recognise it or not, a great wealth of common intelligence and knowledge. If we can tap that knowledge and intelligence we can enrich all the processes that we are involved in, we can bring about much better solutions and we can even involve the people in sustaining these solutions in the future.”

IAP2 Australasia leads call for 2020 to be declared UN International Year of Engagement

The International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) are partnering to promote systematic, quality engagement of stakeholders and the public, to help governments and others who lead and design engagement processes to develop structured, well-planned and meaningful engagement.

IAP2 Australasia is working to submit a proposal for an International Year of Engagement and Public Participation.

To find out more click here https://www.iap2.org.au/About-Us/International-Year-of-Engagement